Dov Seidman

Dov Seidman joins us on Edgewise to discuss his book How: Why How We Do Anything Means Everything. Dov states that “we live in a world where what we do matters, but it doesn’t matter as much as how we do what we do”; we are in a new era of behavior where our actions can affect so much more in ways they never could in the past. This is especially important to acknowledge as behavior has become the greatest source of our competitive advantage. Dov describes what he calls the “how principles” and why these values guide our behavior. He will explain his solution for making jobs more interesting, inspiring and satisfying using such examples as Southwest Airlines.

Deemed “the hottest advisor on the corporate virtue circuit”, by FORTUNE Magazine, Dov Seidman is the founder, chairman and chief executive officer of LRN, a company that helps businesses develop ethical corporate cultures and inspire principled performance. His insights into the complexities of human behavior have been a source of inspiration and innovation for corporate boards, business leaders, government officials and employees around the world, including Allstate, Dow, eBay, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Pfizer, Procter & Gamble and Viacom. Audiences describe Dov Seidman’s presentations as life-changing. Seidman’s unique ability to connect with people at an emotional as well as intellectual level has helped attendees see their lives, purposes, and potential with greater clarity.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Create a Respectful Workplace: Improve Morale, Increase Productivity and Achieve Business Goals
*Expanding Your Influence: Understanding the Psychology of Persuasion
*Responding to Conflict: Strategies for Improved Communication

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*How to Tell Anyone Anything, by Richard S. Gallagher
*Elements of Influence, by Terry R. Bacon
*The Manager’s Guide to Maximizing Employee Potential, by William J. Rothwell

 

Dan Ariely on Understanding the Logic Behind Illogical Decisions

An MIT professor discovers that people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion.

April 18, 2008 / Podcast # 08-16

Dan Ariely

Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Dan Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money. Read more…