Joe Pine on the Evolution of the Economic Model

Using Customization to Renew Commodities

August 24, 2012 / Podcast # 12-17

Joe Pine

Joe Pine, co-author of The Experience Economy, and the brand new book entitled Infinite Possibility joins us on Edgewise to explain the balance between commoditization and customization in progression of economic value. Amazon and Wal-Mart are just two companies that have used transformation as a tool to successfully guide customers to change by using their experiences. Companies such as these are commoditizing goods so they can sell at higher volume and lower cost to the consumer. He outlines three phases of transformations that are required to sustain transformations through time, which include diagnosis, using a set of experiences and following-through. Not only are these transformations crucial to a business setting but can be useful in our personal lives as well.

Joe Pine is an internationally acclaimed author, speaker, and management advisor to Fortune 500 companies and entrepreneurial start-ups alike. He is co-founder of Strategic Horizons LLP, a thinking studio dedicated to helping businesses conceive and design new ways of adding value to their economic offerings.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Pricing Strategies – Capturing and Sustaining a Competitive Advantage
*The Psychology of Management: Why People Do What They Do
*Measuring and Maximizing Marketing ROI
To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*The On-Demand Brand, by Rick Mathieson
*New Directions in Supply-Chain Management, by Tonya Boone, Ph.D., Ram
*One Foot Out the Door, by Judith M. Bardwick, Ph.D.

 

Alexandra Levit on Finding the Job and Employment Success

Avoiding Missteps to Step Ahead

April 6, 2012 / Podcast # 12-07

Alexandra Levit

Alexandra Levit, author of the book Blind Spots: Ten Business Myths You Can’t Afford To Believe On Your New Path To Success discusses her book which points out the biggest myths of business success; the things people believe that don’t work for most of the truly successful. In this edition of Edgewise, Alexandra touches on how the recession has transformed our ideas about how business works and why these myths are more dangerous than ever in a compromised economy. She also stresses the importance of self-promotion in the workplace and the pitfalls to climbing the ladder too quickly, as well as the greatest obstacles facing employees and entrepreneurs in the coming years. You will learn her take on personal censorship and online transparency, and why it’s important to be aware of what you disclose publically.

Alexandra Levitis a nationally recognized business and workplace author and speaker. A syndicated columnist for the Wall Street Journal and a blogger for HuffingtonPost.com, Alexandra has authored several books, including the popular They Don’t Teach Corporate in College, How’d You Score That Gig? and Success for Hire. Alexandra is also a member of the Business Roundtable’s Springboard Project, which is advising the Obama administration on current workplace issues.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Decoding the Unwritten Rules of Executive Career Advancement
*Coaching and Counseling for Outstanding Job Performance
*What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*How to Land a Top-Paying Federal Job, by Lily Whiteman
*The Career Clinic, by Maureen Anderson
*Reinvention, by Brian Tracy

 

Dan Ariely on Understanding the Logic Behind Illogical Decisions

An MIT professor discovers that people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion.

April 18, 2008 / Podcast # 08-16

Dan Ariely

Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Dan Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money. Read more…