communication

Donny Ebenstein on the Other Side of the Story

How to communicate with empathy.

December 13, 2013 / Podcast # 13-25

Donny Ebenstein

When it’s time to ask your boss for a promotion or a raise, the conventional wisdom is to role play the conversation with a friend standing in for your boss to give you a chance to script what you want to say. Donny Ebenstein has some unconventional wisdom: switch places, put yourself in your boss’ shoes. This approach to communication, understanding the point of view of the person you’re talking to, is the cornerstone of Donny’s new book I Hear You, published by AMACOM, where communication isn’t just about hearing but also about understanding.

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Robert Atkinson on Innovation Economics

May 3, 2013 / Podcast # 13-09

Robert Atkinson

Lately, American business has stagnated, resorting to short sighted strategies and opting to take inexpensive or safer quick fixes rather than analyzing and fixing the root of a problem. Robert Atkinson thinks US could to learn from their global neighbors such as France, Germany, Finland, and Korea and study how their focus on innovation has made them leaders in the business world. American business can turn this trend around by following Atkinson’s 3 main factors that facilitate a healthy successful environment for innovation to get America back on to the list of top innovators.

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Jake Breeden on Tipping Sacred Cows

The workplace virtues that aren't as benign as they seem.

March 22, 2013 / Podcast # 13-06

Jake Breeden

Some workplace virtues are not as beneficial as they seem. Jake Breeden talks about the pitfalls and the duality of some of those workplace virtues that seem helpful at first but cause more harm than good in the long term. Jake also discusses the best way to avoid those unintended consequences by discussing the positive and negative of each workplace virtue and how to find their right balance

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Jane Jordan on Managing Media Through a Crisis

Protecting Your Assets in the Digital Age

April 20, 2012 / Podcast # 12-08

Jane Jordan

Jane Jordan, author of the book The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management says that every company should have a crisis communication plan. With the development of social media and new forms of immediate communication, it is even more important than ever. What was once the province of professional reporters is now free and available to everyone. Regardless of a company’s preferred talking points, anyone can hit “post” instantly, as there are fewer and fewer communication boundaries. However, if you have a plan, Jane says it’s possible to be prepared and successfully manage a communication crisis as in the cases involving the Red Cross or BP.

A former journalist with Australian Consolidated Press in Sydney, Jane Jordan has been at the forefront of media training and crisis management for over two decades. She developed a unique four-stage methodology for crisis management whilst at the helm of Australia’s leading media training consultancy, Media Skills. The methodology has been used around the world by hundreds of organizations and thousands of executives.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*How to Create an ITIL Service Desk and Incident Management Process
*AMA’s Insurance and Risk Management Workshop
*Making Sense of Web 2.0: Leveraging Social Media in Your Organization

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*Why Some Companies Emerge Stronger and Better from a Crisis, by Ian I. Mitroff
*Managing Crisis Before They Happen, by Ian I. Mitroff, Gus Anagnos
*Chaotics, by Philip Kotler, John A. Caslione

 

Robert Kaplan’s Roadmap to Effective Leadership

Asking the Critical Questions

March 9, 2012 / Podcast # 12-05

Robert Kaplan

In this edition of Edgewise Robert Kaplan, author of What to Ask the Person in the Mirror: Critical Questions for Becoming a More Effective Leader and Reaching Your Potential, describes the importance of self-management in creating a superb work culture. Robert explains the role of giving and taking honest feedback and which questions you need to ask yourself and which to ask colleagues across all levels of management. Tune in and also learn tips from Robert’s leadership roadmap, including determining when it is ok to say “no” and how to take ownership of your leadership pipeline.
Robert Kaplan is a professor of management practice at Harvard Business School, as well as a co-chairman of Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, a global venture philanthropy firm. He advises numerous companies around the world. Prior to joining Harvard in 2005, Robert was vice chairman of the Goldman Sachs Group.
For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Stepping Up to Leadership: A Course for Administrative Professionals
*Leadership and Team Development for Managerial Success
*Preparing for Leadership: What it Takes to Take the Lead

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*The Little Book of Leadership Development, by Scott J. Allen, Mitchell Kusy
*The AMA Handbook of Leadership, by Marshall Goldsmith, John Baldoni, Sarah McArthur
*The Bible on Leadership, by Lorin Woolfe

 

Scott Keller on Sustaining Organizational Health

Evaluating Long Term Success

February 24, 2012 / Podcast # 12-04

Scott Keller

Scott Keller coauthor of Beyond Performance, discusses the extensive research he conducted in the field of organizational effectiveness. With performance and health managed with equal emphasis being the main takeaway, Scott elaborates on what he means by organizational health and how that directly links to an organization’s performance. Listen as Scott explains how to assess and revive your campanies health.
Scott Keller is a director in the Southern California office of McKinsey & Company, and leads its transformational change practice in the Americas. He has published several articles on change management and organizational behavior, as well as a book for colleagues and clients. He holds an MBA and a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Notre Dame and has worked as a manufacturing manager with Procter & Gamble and a photovoltaic engineer for the U.S. Department of Energy. Outside McKinsey, Scott is a cofounder of Digital Divide Data, an award-winning social enterprise that utilizes a sustainable IT service model to benefit some of the world’s most disadvantaged people.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*The Project Performance Management Workshop: Time, Cost and Budget
*Strategy Execution: Getting It Done
*Create a Respectful Workplace: Improve Morale, Increase Productivity and Achieve Business Goals

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals, by Paul Falcone
*Transforming Performance Measurement, by Dean R. Spitzer, Ph.D.
*The Program Management Office Advantage, by Lia Tjahjana, Paul Dwyer, PMP

 

Tim Phillips on Talking Normally at Work

How plain speech is the most effective in the workplace.

December 30, 2011 / Podcast # 11-52

Tim Phillips

For our last podcast of 2011 we talked to Tim Philips, author of Talk Normal, about the best way to speak professionally. While an evolving and agile language is generally a good thing, it can lead to misunderstandings, highly detrimental in the workplace, especially in a global world where English is mostly spoken as a second language. Tim stresses that perfect grammar and sounding smart is less important than clarity and understanding. Read more…

 

Davia Temin on the 10 Don’ts of Corporate Social Media

Strengthening your brand through smarter online communication

November 18, 2011 / Podcast # 11-46

Davia Temin

According to Davia Temin, companies cannot be hesitant about expanding their online presence, but it is important they avoid the social media pitfalls that have spelled disaster for numerous firms. In this episode of Edgewise, Davia shares her “10 Don’ts of Corporate Social Media,” which explain the dangers of over marketing, automated messages, and abandoning unsuccessful initiatives in cyberspace. Listen and learn how to develop authentic and responsible communication that engages customers and keeps them coming back for more.

Davia Temin is Founder and CEO of Temin and Company which advises global companies’ boards, CEOs, and leadership teams on reputation of crisis management, marketing and media strategy, leadership communications and thought leadership. She is also a first Vice Chair of the Board of Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., Chair of the Board of Video Volunteers, and serves on the advisory boards of the Knight-Bagehot Fellowship at Columbia Journalism School, and ProPublica in Harvard Kennedy School’s Women’s Leadership Board.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:

*Social Media for Managers: New Tools for Communication, Innovation and Collaboration
*Making Sense of Web 2.0: Leveraging Social Media in Your Organization
*Leveraging Social Media to Engage Customers and Build Your Brand

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:

*The On-Demand Brand, by Rick Mathieson
*Digital Engagement, by Leland Harden and Bob Heyman
*Web Copy That Sells, by Maria Veloso

 

Christine Eberle on Social Media and Corporate Culture

Sparking conversations and empowering ideas

October 21, 2011 / Podcast # 11-42

Christine Eberle

Although corporations recognize social media as a powerful tool for talent recruitment, customer engagement and sharing information, many organizations find their social media initiatives fail. According to Christine Eberle, contributor to The Social Media Management Handbook, this is often due to executive resistance or lack of collaboration across a multi-generational workforce. In this episode of Edgewise, Christine explains how companies can overcome these hurdles and leverage social media to facilitate conversations across silos, creating an inspired, engaged and aligned corporate culture.

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Conant and Norgaard on the Leadership Touch

Using the head, heart, and hands to create new leaders

August 5, 2011 / Podcast # 11-31

Doug Conant and Mette Norgaard

“Everyone has experienced the pleasure of working with someone who is learning and growing and everyone has experienced the pain of working with someone who is not,” affirms Douglas Conant, CEO of Campbell’s Soup. Doug with strategic leadership expert, Mette Norgaard, Ph.D, co-authored Touch Points: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments, which is a call to action for executives and managers to commit to employee development. Mette’s research and metrics based assertion is that touch points, strategic, meaningful interactions, are what galvanize people to make ideas happen and ultimately drive success. Listen as Doug and Mette explain how these hands on investments in their employees, translate into exponential returns for companies.
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