Management

Dr. Leah Weiss on Working with Compassion

Finding positivity at work.

April 20, 2018 / Podcast # 18-03

Dr. Leah Weiss

Wish you could find more purpose and meaning in your work? Dr. Leah Weiss, author of How We Work, has techniques to shift your mindset away from work as a transaction of trading time for money and toward something more positive and motivating in the long run.

Leah Weiss, Ph.D., MSW, is a teacher, researcher, and meditation expert at Stanford University specializing in the application of mindfulness and compassion in secular contexts. Leah has taught and consulted in many different settings in addition to Stanford Business School, including Harvard-affiliated hospitals, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford Bing Institute, Google headquarters, the Young Presidents’ Organization, LinkedIn, the Greater Good Science Center at Berkeley, Wisdom 2.0, Esalen Institute, Omega Institute, Spirit Rock Meditation Center, and at the Department of Veterans Affairs, where she teaches mindfulness and compassion to help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress, and to help VA staff around the Bay Area cope with the stress of their jobs helping veterans.

 

Kim Powell on Acting Like a CEO

Taking the mystique out of the C-suite.

April 13, 2018 / Podcast # 18-02

Kim Powell

“CEO” can seem like a venerated title but the people occupying those positions are less intimidating than you might think. Maybe don’t march into their office unannounced and start chatting today, but CEOs are people who make mistakes and have weak spots, just like anyone. Kim Powell, along with her co-author Elena L. Botelho, interviewed thousands of CEOs and other leaders to get to understand the behaviors of those in leadership positions. She shares their findings with us and in her new book The CEO Next Door.

 

Kim R. Powell grew up in Atlanta, and earned a BA from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management. Over the last twenty years, Kim has applied her passion for helping people to her role as a trusted advisor to CEOs and high potential leaders, first at the Boston Consulting Group and now at ghSMART.

 

Mark Murphy on Making Feedback Bearable

Using science to get your message heard.

August 25, 2017 / Podcast # 17-34

Mark Murphy

Handling feedback, both giving and receiving, is one of the most difficult parts of office life. Mark Murphy, author of Truth at Work, has looked into the science of why we hate hearing feedback and has some ways we can deliver even the toughest messages in a way that will get through.

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Kim Scott on Radical Candor

Care personally, challenge directly

May 5, 2017 / Podcast # 17-18

Kim Scott

As a manager there’s a fine line to walk between being friendly and being helpful. That line gets even more blurry for women in the workforce. Kim Scott, author of Radical Candor, joins us with how to walk that line, how to provide even negative feedback while still remembering your colleagues’ humanity.

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Jathan Janove on Hard-Won Wisdom

Manage employees like you've been doing it for decades.

January 6, 2017 / Podcast # 17-01

Jathan Janove

Jathan Janove has learned a lot of things about employee retention, both from the inside as an HR expert and the outside as an employment litigator. He joins us to give some tips from his new book Hard-Won Wisom, published by AMACOM, including his definition of employee engagement and some things you can do right away to make your employees feel more understood and valued.

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Joseph Badaracco on Managing in the Gray

How to deal with hard decisions.

November 18, 2016 / Podcast # 16-32

Joseph Badaracco

When faced with a difficult decision, Joseph Badaracco wants you to gather information like a manager and make a decision like a human being. Meaning, there are plenty of processes to use to get to the bottom of a tricky situation but in the end you need to rely on your own best judgement, whether you’re Tim Cook of Apple deciding whether or not to work with the US Government or you’re a mid-level manager who might have to fire somebody. The author of Managing in the Gray joins us for some examples of other people who have had to rely on their own judgement when there weren’t any answers in the employee handbook.

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John Kotter on Adjusting Your Management Style

What to do when things aren't going well

July 8, 2016 / Podcast # 16-14

John Kotter

Complacency is a real problem in the workforce but panicking and crying wolf to combat it doesn’t work. What John Kotter, author of That’s Not How We Do It Here!, calls “sustained urgency” will eventually wear off and complacency will set in again. Instead, as research as shown, positive energy can be sustained over time without fading away. John has this and other tips for us on how to calibrate your management style to your company and the issues at hand.

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Chris Yeh and Ben Casnocha on the Employee’s Tour of Duty

Truly understanding what your team is trying to accomplish.

February 20, 2015 / Podcast # 15-04

Chris Yeh and Ben Casnocha

In the book The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age authors Chris Yeh and Ben Casnocha, along with Reid Hoffman talk about the relationship between managers and employees and why an alliance-style of communication between the two parties is the most beneficial. They refer to this style as the “Tour of Duty” Model. This type of communication consists of a mission objective, which gives the employee a better understanding of what he or she is trying to accomplish. Managers and employees can use this objective as a tool to determine what each party will eventually attain at the conclusion of the process. One of the most important aspects of the tour of duty model is to set a realistic time period over which the objective gets completed. Another interesting topic discussed in the book is how companies use their employees as “nodes” to gather information about the outside business industry. This can be done by observing other professional’s connections and networks. Yeh and Casnocha believe this can be done by using in-depth networking to maintain up to date company alumni relations. These alumni can help in recruiting, giving feedback, and in referring business.

Chris Yeh is the VP Marketing for PBworks, co-founder and General Partner of Wasabi Ventures, and has been working with high-tech startups since 1995. He has written over 2,000 posts on topics ranging from the psychology of entrepreneurship to achieving happiness in Silicon Valley. Previously, he was the first investor in and interim CEO of Ustream.TV.

Ben Casnocha is an American writer and entrepreneur, based out of San Francisco, California. Casnocha is founder of Comcate, an e-government technology firm, and the author of three books, including the New York Times bestseller The Start-Up of You. He is a keynote speaker at many business events and conventions. In 2006, BusinessWeek named Casnocha one of America’s best young entrepreneurs.

 

Peter R. Worrell on the Golden Age of Mergers and Acquisitions

Beyond the Hollywood model of M&A.

April 18, 2014 / Podcast # 14-08

Peter R. Worrell

Peter R. Worrell, author of Enterprise Value: How the Best Owners-Managers Build Their Fortune, Capture Their Company’s Gains, and Create Their Legacy, discusses the importance for entrepreneurial owner-managers to prepare for the eventual acquisition of his or her company. Worrell is the managing director at Bigelow LLC, which deals exclusively with the private market, and has personally worked with owner-manager clients for over thirty years. He discusses the private market today, how the golden age for mergers and acquisitions has yet to pass, and the most significant reason most acquisitions fail.

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Scott Adams on A Humorous Workplace

How many Dilbert comics are pasted to your cubicle?

February 7, 2014 / Podcast # 14-03

Scott Adams

Scott Adams is the creator of the ubiquitous workplace comic strip Dilbert, a character so iconic that it’s become an actual metric for judging workplace happiness: too many Dilbert comics on the wall and employees probably relate to the character too much but if there are no comics it’s likely indicative of upper management with no sense of humor. Adam’s humor comes from real experience. He’s no stranger to the corporate lifestyle and isn’t uncritical, calling leadership in general “a form of specialized evil.”

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