Efficiency

Dan Hendrix on Leveraging the Benefits of Sustainability

Eliminating a Negative Environmental Footprint

September 21, 2012 / Podcast # 12-19

Dan Hendrix

Dan Hendrix, President and CEO of Interface Incorporated, joins us on Edgewise to discuss sustainability in regards to the transformation of his company Interface. Dan has been working steadily since 1994 to eliminate any negative environmental footprint from Interface by the year 2020. Dan and late former CEO Ray C. Anderson implemented specific business initiatives that helped reduce Interface’s environmental impact, including: eliminating waste, dematerializing the product, and using green energy. These changes have lead not only to a more sustainable company but also one their employees are proud and motivated to work for.

Dan Hendrix serves as the Chief Executive Officer and President of InterfaceFLOR Inc. Mr. Hendrix has been the President and Chief Executive Officer of Interface Inc., since July 1, 2001 and has been its Chairman since October 2011. He joined Interface Inc. in 1983 and served as its Executive Vice President from October 2000 to 2001; Chief Financial Officer from 1985 to 2001; Treasurer since 1984; Vice President – Finance since 1986; and Senior Vice President of Finance since 1995; October 2000. Mr. Hendrix also served for six years as an Audit Manager with a national accounting firm. He also served for six years as an audit manager with a National Accounting Firm.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Strategic Planning
*Leading in a Global Environment
*Taking on Greater Responsibility: Step-up Skills for Nonmanagers

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*Investing in a Sustainable World, by Matthew J. Kiernan
*
The Sustainable Enterprise Fieldbook
, by Jeana Wirtenberg, PhD, William
*Chaotics, by Philip Kotler, John A. Caslione

 

Alexandra Levit on Finding the Job and Employment Success

Avoiding Missteps to Step Ahead

April 6, 2012 / Podcast # 12-07

Alexandra Levit

Alexandra Levit, author of the book Blind Spots: Ten Business Myths You Can’t Afford To Believe On Your New Path To Success discusses her book which points out the biggest myths of business success; the things people believe that don’t work for most of the truly successful. In this edition of Edgewise, Alexandra touches on how the recession has transformed our ideas about how business works and why these myths are more dangerous than ever in a compromised economy. She also stresses the importance of self-promotion in the workplace and the pitfalls to climbing the ladder too quickly, as well as the greatest obstacles facing employees and entrepreneurs in the coming years. You will learn her take on personal censorship and online transparency, and why it’s important to be aware of what you disclose publically.

Alexandra Levitis a nationally recognized business and workplace author and speaker. A syndicated columnist for the Wall Street Journal and a blogger for HuffingtonPost.com, Alexandra has authored several books, including the popular They Don’t Teach Corporate in College, How’d You Score That Gig? and Success for Hire. Alexandra is also a member of the Business Roundtable’s Springboard Project, which is advising the Obama administration on current workplace issues.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Decoding the Unwritten Rules of Executive Career Advancement
*Coaching and Counseling for Outstanding Job Performance
*What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*How to Land a Top-Paying Federal Job, by Lily Whiteman
*The Career Clinic, by Maureen Anderson
*Reinvention, by Brian Tracy

 

Marcus Buckingham on Harnessing Your Key Strengths

Pinpointing and sharpening your comparative edge

December 9, 2011 / Podcast # 11-49

Marcus Buckingham

Marcus Buckingham, author of the new book, Stand Out: The Groundbreaking New Strengths Assessment from the Leader of the Strengths Revolution, believes managers need a cheat sheet to help them identify their key strengths. Using this innovative self-assessment, find out whether your most defining traits characterize you as a pioneer, a teacher, a connector, or any of the other 9 strength roles Marcus identifies. Not only will he point out the consequences of mishandling your strengths, he will help you realize what career is best for you. Read more…

 

Christopher Frank and Paul Magnone

In this age of excess information, research paralysis often impedes business leaders in decision making. Christopher Frank and Paul Magnone, authors of the new book, Drinking from the Fire Hose: Making Smarter Decisions Without Drowning in Information, explain the power of asking key questions to sift through the overwhelming amount of data available. In this episode of Edgewise, Frank and Paul share their Seven Fire Hose Questions to help everyone from CEOs to marketers siphon through this wealth of knowledge to make wiser business decisions.

Read more…

 

Al Pittampalli on the Modern Meeting

Saving time and making decisions

September 2, 2011 / Podcast # 11-35

Al Pittampalli

Meetings are a staple of our work lives that can be an inefficient drain of time, resources and creativity. Al Pittampalli is the author of Read This Before Our Next Meeting, which outlines a fresh methodology to the meeting structure. The “modern meeting” encourages preparedness, speed, and results. Listen and discover how to make meetings fueled by action instead of delaying what needs to get done.
Read more…

 

Jane Stevenson on Driving Innovation

How top leaders fuel creativity and power dynamic results

June 10, 2011 / Podcast # 11-23

Jane Stevenson

Innovation—it’s more than a ubiquitous term for the shiny, new, and different. Jane Stevenson, co-author of Breaking Away: How Great Leaders Create Innovation that Drives Sustainable Growth–and Why Others Fail, mines the minds of high profile executives and shares the gems that spark success. She defines four categories of innovation and the characteristics of leaders within them. She also details how companies like Google & GE use metrics and algorithms to forecast trends, and how CEOS can embrace the ideas of risk and failure along the trajectory to success.
Read more…

 

Robbie Vorhaus on Making Changes to Be More Efficient

The small changes that can change your career.

March 11, 2011 / Podcast # 11-10

Robbie Vorhaus

Robbie Vorhaus wants you to be a watchmaker, not a timekeeper. A timekeeper may always know what time it is, but if they look away from the clock for one moment, they’re not useful anymore. A watchmaker, however, can create a product that will do the job for him or her, and then go on vacation without losing money. The goal is to build skills and a team that make you necessary and still let you step away. Read more…

 

Bill Jensen on How to Hack Your Workplace

How to influence change without permission.

September 24, 2010 / Podcast # 10-39

Bill Jensen

Companies are not designed to help us get our work done. Often there’s an easier way of doing our work but approval processes are slow and ideas stagnate. It’s only a select group of people, “hackers” as Bill Jensen calls them, who rise up and force change with their own ideas and without permission. If used benevolently, the workarounds will become company-wide and increase the workers’ happiness and their free time. Read more…

 

Jim Kirkpatrick on Revamping Training to Increase its Business Impact

How to stay engaged and keep learning.

June 4, 2010 / Podcast # 10-23

Jim Kirkpatrick

Training can’t be a rote process; for the most effective results, job training needs to be customized to each specific audience. Sometimes it even needs to start backwards, focusing on the result first and then moving back to the process. That way training becomes streamlined, more effective, and costs less. In his new book, Training On Trial: How Workplace Learning Must Reinvent Itself To Remain Relevant, Jim Kirkpatrick explains how to continue the training process, constantly adapting the business model. Read more…

 

Michael Bungay Stanier on Great Work

When there's passion, the work turns from good to great.

May 7, 2010 / Podcast # 10-19

Michael Bungay Stanier

Work smart, not hard. Plenty of employees have heard that but how does it actually work? In his new book Do More Great Work, Michael Bungay Stanier offers fifteen different exercises that give practical advice for how to turn your results from good to great. Read more…