Critical Thinking

Devora Zack on Singletasking

Focus to get more done faster.

October 2, 2015 / Podcast # 15-20

Devora Zack

Devora Zack wants you to stop multi-tasking right now. In fact, you weren’t even multi-tasking, you were task-switching. Moving from one project to another always requires a mental reset and even if it’s only momentary those moments add up and take time out of your day. Instead, put all your energy into one task at a time. You’ll get more work done better by doing what Devora calls Singletasking.

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David Allen on Managing Your Attention

Are you appropriately engaged with your job?

September 18, 2015 / Podcast # 15-19

David Allen

David Allen, author of Getting Things Done, uses lists so he doesn’t have to make a plan. This may seem counter-intuitive but it’s actually extremely intuitive thinking. As soon as something crosses your mind it it best to deal with it immediately in the most appropriate way. Most of the time that means writing an action item down on a list to do later. But addressing thoughts as they occur to you, even if that just means acknowledging it and planning on saving it for later, frees up your mind so the real critical thinking can be done on issues that really matter.

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Paul Laudicina on Continuous Organizational Transformation

Rebuilding Your Business Model Successfully

June 15, 2012 / Podcast # 12-12

Paul Laudicina

Paul A. Laudicina, chairman of A.T. Kearney, joins us on Edgewise to discuss the transformation of the company, from subsidiary of a global service firm to a management owned company, and many of the lessons he learned along the way. Paul shares the steps he took to rebuild the company’s business model and reconstitute the organization. He explains the importance of aligning a common set of values and principles unique to your DNA, having a robust strategic planning process which considers all variables, and an organizational culture that is clearly identifiable from the outside looking in. He stresses that it is a continuous process of change and to be prepared to shift direction as required by the business environment and its conditions.

Paul A. Laudicina is Managing Partner and Chairman of the Board of global management consulting firm A.T. Kearney, a position he has held since 2006. He is also the founder and chairman of the firm’s Global Business Policy Council, a forum of CEOs and thought leaders focused on assessing global strategic opportunities and risk management. He was named to Consulting Magazine’s annual ranking of the Top 25 Most Influential Consultants in 2005 and, again, in 2007. He is the author of a number of articles and books on global strategic issues, including World Out of Balance: Navigating Global Risks to Seize Competitive Advantage (McGraw-Hill, 2005). His upcoming book, Beating the Global Odds: High-Stakes Decision Making for Success will be released in September 2012.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Strategic Planning
*AMA’s Advanced Financial Modeling and Forecasting Workshop
*Successful Product Management

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*Facilitating Project Performance Improvement, by Jerry Julian
*Investing in a Sustainable World, by Matthew J. Kiernan
*Transforming Performance Measurement, by Dean R. Spitzer, Ph.D.

 

Jim Collins and Mort Hansen On Flourishing in Uncertainty

A New Look at Surviving Unstable Environments

June 1, 2012 / Podcast # 12-11

Jim Collins and Mort Hansen

Jim Collins and Mort Hansen, co-authors of the book Great By Choice, discuss their research on fundamental business concepts and why some companies excel in chaos, turbulence, and uncertainty while others do not. Jim describes it as the most fascinating analysis that he’s ever been associated with in nearly twenty five years of research. Some of those fascinating insights include the role of luck and innovation, their “triad of behaviors”, as well as firing your “bullets” and then firing your “cannonballs.” Companies like IBM, Microsoft, Southwest and Pacific Airlines have used these techniques with great success.

Jim Collins is the coauthor of Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies. Formerly a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, he jettisoned a traditional academic career in order to chart his own path. Today, he operates a management research laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. Previously, Collins held positions at McKinsey & Company and Hewlett-Packard.

Morten T. Hansen is a management professor at the University of California, Berkeley (School of Information), and at INSEAD. Formerly a professor at Harvard Business School, Morten holds a PhD from Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he was a Fulbright scholar. He is the author of Collaboration and the winner of the Administrative Science Quarterly Award for exceptional contributions to the field of organization studies. Previously a manager with the Boston Consulting Group, Morten consults and gives talks for companies worldwide.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*Managing Chaos: Tools to Set Priorities and Make Decisions Under Pressure
*Managing Chaos: Dynamic Time Management, Recall, Reading and Stress Management Skills for Administrative Professionals
*Confronting the Tough Stuff: Management Skills for Supervisors

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*Leading at the Edge, by Dennis N. T. Perkins, Margaret P. Holtman, Paul R. Kessler, Catherine McCarthy
*Breakthrough!, by Paul Kurnit, Steve Lance

 

Jane Jordan on Managing Media Through a Crisis

Protecting Your Assets in the Digital Age

April 20, 2012 / Podcast # 12-08

Jane Jordan

Jane Jordan, author of the book The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management says that every company should have a crisis communication plan. With the development of social media and new forms of immediate communication, it is even more important than ever. What was once the province of professional reporters is now free and available to everyone. Regardless of a company’s preferred talking points, anyone can hit “post” instantly, as there are fewer and fewer communication boundaries. However, if you have a plan, Jane says it’s possible to be prepared and successfully manage a communication crisis as in the cases involving the Red Cross or BP.

A former journalist with Australian Consolidated Press in Sydney, Jane Jordan has been at the forefront of media training and crisis management for over two decades. She developed a unique four-stage methodology for crisis management whilst at the helm of Australia’s leading media training consultancy, Media Skills. The methodology has been used around the world by hundreds of organizations and thousands of executives.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*How to Create an ITIL Service Desk and Incident Management Process
*AMA’s Insurance and Risk Management Workshop
*Making Sense of Web 2.0: Leveraging Social Media in Your Organization

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*Why Some Companies Emerge Stronger and Better from a Crisis, by Ian I. Mitroff
*Managing Crisis Before They Happen, by Ian I. Mitroff, Gus Anagnos
*Chaotics, by Philip Kotler, John A. Caslione

 

Scott Keller on Sustaining Organizational Health

Evaluating Long Term Success

February 24, 2012 / Podcast # 12-04

Scott Keller

Scott Keller coauthor of Beyond Performance, discusses the extensive research he conducted in the field of organizational effectiveness. With performance and health managed with equal emphasis being the main takeaway, Scott elaborates on what he means by organizational health and how that directly links to an organization’s performance. Listen as Scott explains how to assess and revive your campanies health.
Scott Keller is a director in the Southern California office of McKinsey & Company, and leads its transformational change practice in the Americas. He has published several articles on change management and organizational behavior, as well as a book for colleagues and clients. He holds an MBA and a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Notre Dame and has worked as a manufacturing manager with Procter & Gamble and a photovoltaic engineer for the U.S. Department of Energy. Outside McKinsey, Scott is a cofounder of Digital Divide Data, an award-winning social enterprise that utilizes a sustainable IT service model to benefit some of the world’s most disadvantaged people.

For additional training on this topic, consider these AMA seminars:
*The Project Performance Management Workshop: Time, Cost and Budget
*Strategy Execution: Getting It Done
*Create a Respectful Workplace: Improve Morale, Increase Productivity and Achieve Business Goals

To learn more, read these AMACOM Books:
*2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals, by Paul Falcone
*Transforming Performance Measurement, by Dean R. Spitzer, Ph.D.
*The Program Management Office Advantage, by Lia Tjahjana, Paul Dwyer, PMP

 

Stefan Swanepoel on Leveraging Your Animal Instincts

An organic approach to thriving in the corporate jungle

September 9, 2011 / Podcast # 11-36

Stefan Swanepoel

Here’s a serious question: Are you an elephant or a crocodile? According to author and businessman Stefan Swanepoel, the answer could determine your career path and level of success. Stefan’s latest book Surviving Your Serengeti: 7 Skills to Master Business & Life is a New York Times best-seller that uses animals and their characteristics as metaphors for professionals and their skills and competencies. Listen to identify and unleash your inner beast.
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Bill Holland on Cracking the New Job Market

August 19, 2011 / Podcast # 11-33

Bill Holland

What do Food network star Paula Dean and waste management mogul Sidney Torres have in common? They bred their super successful brands out of hardship, career expert, Bill Holland explains in this episode of Edgewise. Bill shares strategies from his new book, Cracking the New Job Market: The Seven Rules for Getting Hired in Any Economy (AMACOM), and lays out how to represent yourself as a professional brand that clearly defines your value as congruent with what employers are recruiting for.
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Tony Miller on Systemically Strengthening Our Schools

Employing business development practices to target deficiencies in America’s Education System

June 24, 2011 / Podcast # 11-25

Tony Miller

In devising a strategy to bolster the nation’s eroded educational framework, Anthony Miller, Chief Operating Officer of the U.S. Department of Education, pulls from his business background as well as international research on the processes and metrics employed by other countries to raise the academic bar. At the core of Tony’s blueprint, is the alignment of student achievement goals and initiatives with budgets and operating plans, and making critical investments in training teachers, particularly in the use of technology and collaboration tools to facilitate communication and maximize targeted learning. Tony also discusses partnerships between major corporations and higher education systems, and the importance of deploying such initiatives to equip students with the competencies most essential to competing and exceling in the 21st century global workplace.
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Jane Stevenson on Driving Innovation

How top leaders fuel creativity and power dynamic results

June 10, 2011 / Podcast # 11-23

Jane Stevenson

Innovation—it’s more than a ubiquitous term for the shiny, new, and different. Jane Stevenson, co-author of Breaking Away: How Great Leaders Create Innovation that Drives Sustainable Growth–and Why Others Fail, mines the minds of high profile executives and shares the gems that spark success. She defines four categories of innovation and the characteristics of leaders within them. She also details how companies like Google & GE use metrics and algorithms to forecast trends, and how CEOS can embrace the ideas of risk and failure along the trajectory to success.
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