collaboration

Joel Peterson on The 10 Laws of Trust

How to cultivate trust on your team.

October 21, 2016 / Podcast # 16-28

Joel Peterson

Culture drives performance. In a high-trust culture people are going to be more productive and innovative than a culture where they’re constantly on high alert. Joel Peterson, co-author of The 10 Laws of Trust, published by AMACOM, is here to talk about how to cultivate a high-trust environment on your team.

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Jennifer Kahnweiler on the Genius of Opposites

How introverts and extroverts make great teams together.

September 2, 2016 / Podcast # 16-21

Jennifer B. Kahnweiler, Ph.D.

Introverts and extroverts have different and sometimes contradictory strengths. When they pair up and manage to find a way to work together, introverts and extroverts can create power teams. Jennifer Kahnweiler, Ph.D., author of the new book The Genius of Opposites, joins us again to give us examples of some of those dynamic duos and how they managed to work together.

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Andrew Faas on the True Face of Bullying

Bullying comes in more forms than we expect.

April 1, 2016 / Podcast # 16-07

Andrew Faas

Bullying is still a hot topic, one even world leaders are weighing in on. However, bullying looks different in the workplace than it does on the playground, more subtle and insidious. Some workplace cultures even encourage bullying behavior. Andrew Faas has some tips on how to identify bullying and what to do when you discover it.

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Dr. David Livermore on Effective Diversity

Making diversity a priority, not a buzzword

March 4, 2016 / Podcast # 16-05

Dr. David Livermore

Diversity leads to innovation but it doesn’t happen magically. It’s about more than just getting people into the same room, it’s about creating an environment that fosters the free exchange of ideas. Dr. David Livermore, author of the new book Driven by Difference, published by AMACOM, is here to talk about how to foster an environment that nurtures ideas from all your people.

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Cass Sunstein on Getting Past Groupthink

Making the right, not necessarily popular, decision

October 16, 2015 / Podcast # 15-21

Cass Sunstein

Cass Sunstein defines “groupthink” as “when you have a group of people whose members don’t disclose what they actually know” and instead make a decision based on what they think is popular to the group as a whole. This conformity can be disastrous. Luckily Sunstein is here to talk about his new book Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter and how to make informed decisions.

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Jim McCann on Conversational Leadership

Being a better leader by chatting.

August 7, 2015 / Podcast # 15-16

Jim McCann

Jim McCann, of 1-800-Flowers and author of Talk is Not Cheap, wants you to talk to your employees. Not just because it’s the nice thing to do (though it is). But once you’ve established a rapport with people it’s much easier to be an effective leader. They’ll trust you and you’ll have more insight into what motivates them individually. Talk is not cheap, it’s worth quite a lot.

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Tom Yorton on Improv Skills at Work

April 17, 2015 / Podcast # 15-08

Tom Yorton

Do you wish you could run a meeting like Tina Fey? Or work a room like Stephen Colbert? It’s not just about humor in the workplace (although that too, is vital) but how to work as a truly collaborative team and learning to stop fearing failure. The new book Yes, And: How Improvisation Reverses “No, But” Thinking and Improves Creativity and Collaboration–Lessons from The Second City, coauthored by Tom Yorton and Kelly Leonard, incorporates lessons from the legendary improvisational theater troupe into business best practices.

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Deb Bright on Learning to Love Criticism

How to learn that criticism is good for you.

November 14, 2014 / Podcast # 14-23

Deb Bright

In The Truth Doesn’t Have to Hurt How to Use Criticism to Strengthen Relationships, Improve Performance, and Promote Change author Deb Bright talks about ‘criticism’s’ bad reputation and the stigma that is attached to it in the workplace. She argues that criticism is actually more beneficial than not and that its sole purpose is to help someone do something better, achieve goals, and grow personally and professionally. The purpose of the book, Bright says, is to give givers and receivers of criticism the skills they need in order to communicate with one another, and have productive conversations that build trust and respect. Deb gives listeners techniques such as “quick charges” in order to better help them receive criticism and utilize it in the best way possible.

Deb Bright, PH.D. is founder and president of Bright Enterprises, Inc., a consulting firm devoted to enhancing performance. Her impressive roster of clients includes Raytheon, Marriott, Disney, GE, Chase, Morgan Stanley, and other premier organizations.

 

Rod Collins on Wiki Management

Small changes for a more collaborative world.

November 1, 2013 / Podcast # 13-22

Rod Collins

In a world shifting from command and control to networks, managers have to adapt their expectations while still keeping their employees accountable. The three most important and most basic changes are what Rod Collins calls The Three M’s: Managers, Meetings, & Measures. These three components of the workplace seem unavoidable but by resetting expectations so that managers become facilitators and meetings become highly functional dialogs instead of debates. Making some small changes to tip the organization into a more networked style is the key to Collins’ advice in his new book, published by AMACOM, Wiki Management: A Revolutionary Model for a Rapidly Changing and Collaborative World.

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Morton Mandel on Hiring “A Employees”

Hiring the best employees for your customers.

September 20, 2013 / Podcast # 13-19

Morton Mandel

CEO of Parkwood Corp, chairman and CEO of the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Foundation, Morton Mandel has reached great success in both his financial and personal life. In his book It’s All About Who… Morton talks about his humble beginnings from working a summer job for his uncle in the wholesale auto parts business, to owning that same business with his brothers in July 1940. Though Morton joined the Army in World War II and left the business world behind him, it wasn’t until after the war Morton and his brothers took a hard look at why their business was struggling to turn a major profit. Morton and his brothers realized that in an over-saturated market you have to come up with a different solution to attract customers; that sometimes business owners need to take a step back to see what their customers really need. What they learned propelled them into the future to live richer lives both monetarily and in the quality of life. Now Morton shares what he has learned about what a CEO is worth and how to hire and maintain “A employees”.

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